About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
CSPAN2 28
LANGUAGE
English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
is that in scotland. , came back over to be a conscientious objector when united states was at war. and consulate had to push the boundary of what was acceptable in order to show he was being true to himself and true to his principle and fighting for principles. and then the youngest, arthur, was a lot less sure of what to do. struggled at princeton, kind of didn't do what he wanted to do, thought about opening a part of them thought about being a missionary. >> with three mighty oaks in front of you -- >> exactly. why do you think there's no place in princeton for a boy such as you? and he was not so sure the world was a good idea, he was also not ready to go to prison to protest. he was a lot more like most of us. >> and there must have been a mother. >> there was. she was pretty extraordinary. she had her own pretty extraordinary path. she had grown up daughter of missionaries, and then her father, then the first present of the all white colleges of reconstruction in the south here but then she got on to marry a minister and had a very conventional life in ohio, big brood of kids. involved in chur
wish to pay tribute to scott mcclairen for the royal regiment of scotland. this week i witnessed at first hand the sacrifice of our soldiers. i pay tribute to the bravy of this brave soldier. our thoughts will be with his family and friends but we pay tribute and all like him who serve our country so magnificently in afghanistan and elsewhere. >> here, here. >> i had meetings with ministerial members. >> can i agree with what the prime minister said and i have a son in afghanistan. it's a dreaded thing thinking you get that knock on the door that he's lost in action. and our sympathies go with scott's father and mother and that particular team. here, here. >> mr. speaker, that yesterday we give 10 billion pounds to the bailout to banks in greece. we give 7 billion pounds to the bailout in ireland. we give 100 billion, this is the british taxpayer, 100 million a year for their -- the quality of the banks in this country for insurance purposes and other purposes, why does the prime minister does not get on his back and go down to the friends of the city? instead -- >> we got the gi
years, especially for evan levin over in scotland, what influence was that to what he and norman thought as opposed to what ralph and arthur -- >> sure, it was huge. world war i was unbelievable. i mean, 1.8 million germans, 1.7 million russians, 1.4 million frenchmen. i mean, the death was just astonishing. even in the u.s. u.s. launched about 50,000, but really the fighting only lasted six months. they were losing like a 1020 meant a day. that's just unbelievable. you know, evan, he was over in scotland and then also in london a little bit. you know, he thought and
at a quarry in scotland. but, many as a matter of principle refused alternative service as well. and they were sent to prison. more than 6000 young englishman went to prison during the war. the largest number of people up to that point in time ever in prison for political reasons in a western democracy. they served their sentences in places like wandsworth prison in the photograph here, in southwest london. those that you can see stretched across the opening there is to prevent people from committing suicide. prison conditions were extremely harsh. prisoners lived under what was called the rule of silence, where you were not allowed to talk to your fellow prisoners. they found ways around it of course, tapping on cell walls and whispering to people and whatnot, but they lived several years under those conditions. the diet with terrible. there was a shortage of coal. the prisons were very cold. many people died in prison. so, i was fascinated by these war resisters. for the longest time, i could not figure out how, from a storytelling point of view, i was going to get the resisters and the gene
authorities. there aren't too many conservative local authorities i can congratulate in scotland. i wish everyone who is going to take part the best of luck. >> speaker, would the prime minister confirm that all witnesses to all aspects of the promised inquiries will be required to give evidence under oath? >> as i explain, it's going to be one inquiry with two parts and led by one judge that will agree to the terms of reference set out the way it's going to work and be responsible for calling people under oath. >> order. statement the prime minister. >> with volition, i'd like to make a statement. in recent days, the whole country has been shocked by the revelations of the phone hacking scandal. what the country and house has to confront is an episode that is frankly disgracement. accusations of widespread law breaking by parts of the press allege corruption and a failure of political system over many, many years to tackle the problem that has been getting worse. we must, i think, at all times, keep front and center the real victims of this. relatives of those who died at the hands of t
minister say whether this inquiry does extend to scotland? does include the issues such as policing which has devolved in scotland and the scotland's first minister for that and in that context has he secured an assurance from an uncharacteristic required first minister about his contact with news international? >> i can confirm this inquiry does extend to scotland. as i said we did send the draft terms of reference to get the administrations. we were able to accept a number of points. there was one specific point that the scottish administration wanted dealt with, which concerned the information commissioners' report which we haven't put specifically into the terms but, of course, it will be dealt with by the inquiry because it's such an important part of the work. more generally speaking, when it comes to the relationship between politicians and media, this inquiry will be able to go where the evidence leads. >> lee scott. >> does my right honorable friend agree with that welfare allegations in the metropolitan police have a vast majority of hundreds of police officers are protecting us
years especially for evin who had been over in scotland, what influence he and norman fought as opposed to what ralf and arthur -- >> it was huge. i mean, world war i was just unbelievable. i mean, 1.8 million germans, 1.7 million russians, 1.4 million frenchmen, just the deaf even in the u.s., you know, the u.s. lost about 50,000, but really the fighting only lasted for six months. they were losing 820 men a day. that's just unbelievable. you know, evan was over in scotland, and then also and london a little bit, and she saw what it was like to see men come home without limbs and things like that, and also what it was like to be in london when the bombs were falling, but every man response to violence and every culture responds in different ways, he was actually wounded on the western front and recuperated in these hospitals, but he remained proud of what he had done and father was the right thing until the end of the war she was disillusioned, so i think that and they were well aware of how devastating the violence was but i don't find predictably drove them when we or another. but th
now to the alternative though. but in scotland, the people were like the new members for their default legislators. and the results very between surprising and standing. and wales later celebrated taking outright control of the national assembly. in northern ireland it was a night of trance. robinson retained his job as minister in the most notable results came in scotland. the smb select the challenge of raber one outside control of the parliament, so stargate inevitable thoughts about the referendum when they sued on scottish independence. in between the big u.k. events, huge global event happened in the early hours of the first of may, osama bin laden, probably the best most wanted man was shot dead by americans peschel forces. osama bin laden had been living in a house in pakistan just an hour away from islamabad. helicopters raided the compound and landed a group of u.s. navy seals in a burst of gunfire, the al qaeda leader was killed, his body was. i see. americans celebrated his death in the world wondered about retaliation. i minister david cameron addressed the comment. >> we
into the claim off to scotland because -- [inaudible] >> we'll adjourn on that note. >> thank you very much, indeed. [applause] >> historian andrew roberts on booktv. and to find out more visit the author's web site, andrew-roberts.net. ♪ >> coming up next, booktv presents "after words," an hourlong program where we invite guest hosts to interview authors. this week, author eric stakelbeck asserting the obama administration is concealing the true magnitude of terrorist attack on u.s. soil. he makes his case using interviews with covert operatives and people he says are terrorists with link to al-qaeda. he discusses his findings with former u.s. house representative and radio host fred grandy. >> after i read this book, i came across a few facts that i want to run by you because i think it sets up the discussion pretty well. according to some data i've just seen, there are over 1200 government organizations across the country involve inside intelligence -- involved in intelligence, counterterrorism and homeland security. we've got about 850,000 people with top security clearances, and the
. as opposed to, you know, white americans being from scotland or norway or -- >> guest: well, i think so, yes. i mean, it's a country. we belong to the, we belong to a nation. and so, um, and it's one that's still there functioning. you know, we haven't left it. and we can't leave it. i mean, it's who we are. >> host: this e-mail from ricardo from texas, how hard was it to get published for the first time?
in scotland but as a matter of principle refuse to alternative services as well and sent to prison. more than 6,000 young englishmen went to prison during the war. the largest number of people up to the point* in time ever imprisoned for political reasons, they serve the sentences in places like here coming southwest london, that metal netting stretching across the opening is to prevent people from committing suicide. and prison conditions were extremely harsh. prisoners lived under the rule of silence rerun not allowed to talk to our fellow prisoners. they found ways around a buy tapping and whispering but to live under those conditions was tough. the diet was terrible, shortage comment it was cold and many people died in prison. i was fascinated by the stories. for the longest time i could not figure out how from a story telling point* of view i would get the resistors and the generals into the same book. i did not want to do a series of portraits of one then the other but then a clue came to me one day when i wis reading a scholarly article about a well-known pacifist. she was the ardent o
into the plane off to scotland because -- that would have been tremendously helpful. [laughter] >> [inaudible] >> thank you very much indeed. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> historian andrew roberts on booktv. visit the author's website andrew-roberts.net. >> what are you reading this summer in book tvments to know. >> first book on my reading list this spring and summer was kleopatra, and what a great insight in recounting her life. it was a book recommended to me, and so i decided to pick it up and read it and then continued with the strong woman theme if you will with elizabeth the first, and that's on my ipad, i'm reading these both as e-books. going back doing these two, it got me on to the historical and older novel type approach and with my bible study group, i'm rereading pilgrim's progress which is delightful to get back into that. it's been awhile since i've reread it and because there's a movie coming up, i, with my family, we're rereading atlas which is very tel
-atlantic airlines and we can understand that, i am a little concerned that when you sat at your desk in scotland yard in 2009 you didn't consider the report from 2006 which said investigations by the i t a and the police uncovered evidence widespread of organized under cover market, confidential personal information. many journalists looking for a story. in one major case investigated by the party a the evans that information supplied to 305 named journalists working a range of newspapers. were you aware of this? and the fact that there was the kind of industrial level happening going on at the time? >> yes. i was aware of the report. it was under ferry narrow reach. [talking over each other] >> what is your question? >> in light of that, did you not think it might be appropriate to go back over the 11,000 documents, look at them and see if there was additional evidence that we would not associate with the two which were covered by mr. ellis's questions to see whether there might be additional of leads which could be followed up in a manner similar to the investigation? >> you talk about command
". this is almost an hour. >> tonight scotland yard in turmoil. another resignation of the top. police biggest casualty of the phone-hacking scandal. assistant commissioner john yates follow his boss's example quits more in anger than in sorrow. >> there continues to be a huge amount of inaccurate, ill-informed and on occasion down right malicious gossip being published about me personally. >> another bizarre twist tonight. sean hoare the initial "news of the world" whistle blower is found dead. david cameron cuts short of visit to africa. >> i'm determined to get to the bottom of it. >> tonight we examine the damage he is suffering and the state of the met. then we'll talk about that committee hearing with rupert murdoch tomorrow. also tonight the united states prepared last month their drones have stopped killing pakistani civilians. we have news evidence which says that's wrong. good evening is britain's biggest and most important police force merely inexcept or corrupt or possibly both? you can forgive people for wondering. public confidence in the police is said to be rocking after two hi
think that you organize the press to be outside scotland yard, or your department did when he made his statement saying that he was not taking matters further. why did you employ him knowing this? >> i want to be as open and helpful as akin to the committee, but as you will be aware on a couple hours ago -- [inaudible] for investigation. i have not been able to take advice in the times i hope that you'll bear with me and perhaps guide me. [inaudible] spent all of our witnesses have been referred to the independent commission and that didn't stop the commissioner, so you can take your guidance of him. this is a committee of parliament which is sovereign, and we can take evidence where ever we want and tell summit is charged with a criminal offense and there's no risk of you being charged, is the? >> i don't believe so. >> so you're free to answer our questions because the point i may, i have not had the opportunity of independent advice were others may have. >> if you could answer our questions. we know the facts, or background anyway. you can give us the facts. you were the decision to
you something about it. i was asked to recall the meeting at scotland yard in 2002. i was off recently by channel 4 about the story. my information, my recollection of that meeting was entirely different. my recollection is the meeting was on a completely different subject. i am only going on what i was told by channel 4. the meeting in november, that was what was put to me. i checked my diary as much as possible. no meeting in november. but subsequently, very early january it may be that meeting was not my recollection of the meeting. on the other hand, i did have some regular meetings. >> rupert murdoch said he relied on lieutenants that he trusted. who would you trust? >> the news room at any newspaper is trust. if you think about -- i am sure paul farrelly would agree. think about way a story gets published it depends on trust. you rely on people that work for you to behave in a proper manner and you rely on the information you are given at the time. that is why i am with the committee today about the interception of milly dowler's voicemail not commenting on what other people knew
of revulsion are particularly sold in scotland. can i ask the prime ministera quickly we can understand whatoe needs to be done to tackle it. d w >> i do have regular conversations with him. i think in this case the best thing to do is toc make sure tht administration's are happy withl administration are happy with the terms of reference to work out how the inquiry is going to relate to the duval administration and any evidence can be put into the inquiry in the way i suggest. >> mr. speaker, even if private medical details are obtained without breaking the law, it doesn't mean they are right to publish, especially when it relates to a child. can the prime minister confirm the inquiry will consider and recommend what meaningful actions can be taken when they didn't act against the law, but standards and ethics. >> the lady makes a good point. we will look at that. what regulatory people you have, you still have to have people at the top of newspapers and media organization who take responsibility. who recognize it's not right to reveal someone is pregnant, for instance, when there's no certain
with journalists, were you not, while they were being investigated by scotland yard that is improper isn't it? >> put yourself in my shoes. we have to go back to the time line with what happened and i can't remember that. >> i can remember that. >> i can't remember the timing of when those happen in relation to what was going on in their investigation but i absolutely agree there was an occasion when they were investigated that that may have happened. now the judgment is there's no way i ever discourage anything -- >> you say that. you have made a judgment call to accept hospitality from people you are investigating other criminal offense. that's correct, isn't it? you think that is an appropriate course of action to have taken? >> let me finish. the judgment is to say let's not do that and make some excuses. i discussed that with a senior colleague there at the time. this was the director of communications. >> what is his name? >> [inaudible] >> not to have that the dinner would be potentially more suspicious than to have it. [laughter] i don't know why you're laughing because -- >> i'm very
is the first. >> how far? how far does this go? who was working for the news as a translator, scotland yard at the same time and so on. >> i don't know that this is something of what has been launched but what is clear is there was a culture in which it just wasn't a few bad apples doing bad things. of it was we would be left tory but now people who word good people thought it was normal to have lunch with a journalist and maybe take something to be wrong. >> and then it why when this came up? there was a degree of complacency. >> the whole political class i have underestimated this for a long time because frankly we are trying to win the approve real hotbed of editors and even proprietors and we are all at fault for pro he is not excluded nor the only one. >> do you worry there would be more resignations over the mass? these two at the top of the tree but they were feeding them information that turned out to be rubbish spam if their house of been a proper investigation. but those before anybody have the proper investment, here is a nonsense being spoken you are constantly in the media spot
with scotland yard. >> the news international letters demonstrates that they are cooperating with police inquiries, and have evidence and there was evidence they were cooperating because they were providing. unless you contrary evidence that they were deliberately obstructing you in anyway, you cannot get a production lawyer. there's lawyers at this table i know who will reiterate that. you cannot get evidence, and i'm one of them. >> the reality is you are seeking to blame the legal process for something that is actually the metropolitan police fault, isn't? >> completely disagree with your. >> can i ask you this quick do you know who first recommended mr. wallis to mr. fedorcio? >> i don't know that. >> you didn't make inquiries about that when you were asked? [inaudible] >> did you make inquiries about mr. wallis? wallis? at all from a mr. fedorcio? deana who recommended him speakers i do not recall how it came in this process in terms of who else on the list was responsible for producing the tendering process. i'm sure he said that. i was aware, presumably before 31st of august, 29,
a substantial volume of information to the scotland yard, and in return, he received dozens of items of confidential and for action from the police and that is the obligation. >> most journalists who work for the crime editor or half a working relationship and their particular police force. >> when our report was published in early 2010 was when you were chief executive of news international, and there were certain things we're obviously we found that the evidence from the people from the news international was unsatisfactory and collecting in nisha we refer to in the reports and we felt it was inconceivable that he was a reporter as passed on to that we refer to the e-mail and all that kind of stuff. when you were the chief executive of news international at the time that report was published did you read the report we published? >> yes, i did. i'm not saying i read every word but a large majority. i read the criticisms that were addressed to the company, and i can only hope that from the evidence that you heard from us today that we have really stepped up our investigation and that
were bought and sold. scotland yard got testy today claiming people were trying to leak allegations that the "news of the world" tried to get phone numbers to members of the royal family by bribing police officer. richard watson now from the police. >> once again the ethics which should underpin the relationship between police and journalists is under scrutiny. as never before. when it works, cops need publicity to help them investigate. but a sort of allegations in recent days shows the darker side. >> any journalist work is sold -- sensitive information. that's what excludes them. but clearly there is a line that can't be crossed, and today's news as a member of the royal protection squad has allegedly passed on information for return for cash to come is yet another profound shock. >> personal protection officers travel in the same car as the royals. close protection officers in backup vehicles. others guard buildings. the bbc was told today that the notion of the "news of the world" former royal editor asked his editor who went on to work for the p.m. for 1000 pounds to be paid t
the support of all of our colleagues. on december 21st, 1988, pan am 103 exploded over lockerbie scotland. 12 years later, the individual who was convicted of conspiracy for planting the bomb that brought down the flight was sent to serve a life sentence in august of 2009, he was released on compassionate grounds by the scottish government who said he has less than three months to live today approaching two years he remains live and in tripoli. these families have been searching for justice and for answers for more than 20 years. and the rupture of the gadhafi government presents a real opportunity to learn who ordered the bombing. who collected the intelligence to carry out the plan? who made the bomb and in addition to the bomber who bears responsibility for this and other heinous attacks and who should be brought to justice so does three things. it requires the president to continue many investigative activities into the bombing of pam am 103 and other terrorist attacks attributed to the government. the president urged the transitional national council and any successor government of libya
the prime minister to meet quickly with the first minister of scotland so we can understand the state in scotland and what needs to be done to tackle it? >> i do have regular conversations with him. i think in this case, the best thing is to make sure the duval administration are happy with the terms of reference to work out how the inquiry is going to relate to the duval administration and any evidence can be put into the inquiry in the way i suggest. >> mr. speaker, even if private medical details are obtained without breaking the law, it doesn't mean they are right to publish, especially when it relates to a child. can the prime minister confirm the inquiry will consider and recommend what meaningful actions can be taken when they didn't act against the law, but standards and ethics. >> the lady makes a good point. we will look at that. what regulatory people you have, you still have to have people at the top of newspapers and media organization who take responsibility. who recognize it's not right to reveal someone is pregnant, for instance, when there's no certainly they'll keep
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)